Welcome to the Big Cats In Britain Wildlife Trigger Camera Blog

Welcome to the Big Cats In Britain Wildlife Trigger Camera Blog

The Big Cats in Britain organisation, (BCIB), predominately searches for evidence of native and non native feline species living in the British Countryside. Part of our research includes the use of wildlife trigger cameras, also known as stealth cams or trail cams . These operate using infra-red technology to take pictures of any animal that passes the camera.

Our members have dozens of these cameras in various locations around the British Isles, operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

This blog is dedicated to showing the general public, the animals we have captured on camera. These images are small snapshots of the diversity of animal life that can be found in our countryside.

We hope you enjoy them.......................

All images are copyright of the BCIB, if you wish to use any of these images online or in the media, please contact us first to obtain permission.

Scottish Wildcat Images

June 2009


This was taken on Sunday 28th June 2009, in woods in the south of Kintyre in Scotland. I managed to get a short piece of video as I followed it up the path. The video is very shaky, as It was a fair distance away, I was trying to follow it and I was being eaten alive by midges.


Steve Piper at the Scottish Wildcat Association managed to stabalise this footage somewhat.


Although not a full blood Scottish wildcat, Steve agreed with my initial thoughts saying "...I think I can positively identify it as a reasonable hybrid; the markings are very good looking on the body, the tail is too slender and tapered with the beginnings of a dorsal strips at the top though, that's the main giveaway, overall the cat looks a little more slender than a pure wildcat but it has to be at least a 50/50 or better"

Shaun Stevens




The following comments were made by the Scottish Wildcat Association on their youtube site

"Shaun Stevens at Big Cats in Britain kindly sent us this video he managed to grab on an extreme zoom of a hybrid wildcat in Scotland. The zoom makes it a little shaky but you can make out enough to see this cat bears many classic wildcat markings, sadly diluted by domestic ancestors in the family tree; pay attention to the tail which is quite slim and tapers to a point, notice also the tail bands are almost forming a dorsal stripe. Pure wildcats have very distinct bands, a tail about 2-3 times as thick and it always ends in a blunt tip like a baseball bat. Thanks Shaun; www.bigcatsinbritain.org"